The Case of the Gluten Free Corn Dogs–and a Giveaway!

I nervously answered my cell phone. The call was from our local neighborhood security company, and my husband and I were away on vacation.

“Ma’am, there are a lot of boxes on your doorstep . . . they appear to be . . . ugh, corn dogs.”

I let out a sigh. I’d forgotten Foster Farms had offered to send me their new gluten free corn dogs to review. I explained to the baffled officer that I was a food blogger and I’d have my neighbor put them in our freezer.

That was last October. Those corn dogs sat in my basement freezer until the College Celiac came home for his winter break a few weeks ago. Because they contain soy, corn and egg which I’m allergic to, I couldn’t taste them myself. Which was really frustrating because I once liked corn dogs–before allergies and celiac disease–and the photo on the box taunted me every time I opened the freezer door.

As soon as College Celiac dropped his backpack on the kitchen floor, I said, “Wanna corn dog?”  I really needed that freezer space for the Christmas ham.

College Celiac was more than willing to oblige. Corn dogs were always one of his childhood favs.

He quickly microwaved two. After I took the obligatory blog photos, he microwaved the corn dogs again because they got cold.

IMG_3422

 College Celiac’s review of Foster Farms Gluten Free Corn Dogs: Two Thumbs Up!

My college boy was happy the breading didn’t crumble like a lot of gluten-free breading–even after microwaving two times–and he said they were tasty. Well, what he said was: “They taste like the corn dogs I used to eat.” This is high praise coming from a guy who hasn’t eaten gluten in three years.  Of course, he added a little Cholula sauce–he and his brother eat everything with Cholula sauce!

Foster Farms GF Corn Dogs

So here’s the lowdown on these dogs. They are certified by the Gluten Intolerance Group, which requires foods to have less than 10 ppm of gluten per serving; a serving is one dog. GIG also evaluates every ingredient for cross contamination. A press release from Foster Farms says, “All ingredients are required to be gluten free and are labeled, stored and processed separately from other ingredients. Foster Farms Gluten Free products are manufactured separately from all other normal finished products. Analytical verification testing measures and sanitation practices are instituted, documented and confirmed with every production run.”

Kudos to Foster Farms for their gluten-free practices and their transparency. Wish more companies would publish statements about what they do to keep those of us with celiac disease and food allergies safe.

You should be able to find Foster Farm Gluten Free Corn Dogs, as well as gluten free breast strips and nuggets, at your local grocery store. If not, call Foster Farms at 800-255-7227 for help finding a retailer. Even better, tweet this post with #FFGlutenFree, like this post and/or write a comment below, or like my Facebook page and you can win a voucher for a free box of Foster Farms Gluten Free Corn Dogs.

The Case of the Gluten Free Corn Dogs first appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie

Start the New Year with Udi’s Gluten Free–Enter Giveaway Today!

The Udi’s Gluten Free “care packages” arrived just in time for the College Celiac’s Christmas Break. It’s been a rough four years, trying to adapt to life with celiac disease while being away from home. Okay, truth be told, it’s been harder on me than him. I worried if he was eating enough nutritious foods.

So I was thrilled to introduce my son to new foods from a company I trust. These burritos were a hit. He added Cholula Hot Sauce. What is it with college boys and Cholula?

Udi's Gluten Free has eight varieties of burritos. Allergens: Egg, Dairy, Corn

Udi’s Gluten Free has eight varieties of burritos. Allergens: Egg, Dairy, Corn

Based on the dirty dishes I woke up to on several mornings, the Udi’s Gluten Free Plain Tortillas were also quite good.

These tortillas come in small and large. Dairy, soy and nut free. Allergens: egg.

These tortillas come in small and large. Dairy, soy and nut free. Allergens: egg.

For those of you who are regular readers, you know I’m not much of a baker. Thankfully, Udi’s provided the College Celiac with treats this holiday: Snicker Doodle Cookies and Dark Chocolate Brown Bites (both soy and nut free). I have no photos because they disappeared so quickly.  And someone only left one  Double Vanilla Muffin.

Who ate all the Udi's Gluten Free Muffins?!

Who ate all the Udi’s Gluten Free Muffins?!

My plan was to add berries on top of the muffins with some whipped cream.  In fact, I’d planned on creating several of the terrific ideas Udi’s Gluten Free pinned on Pinterest, but then the other hungry son with food allergies came home.

For Christmas dinner, I served Udi’s Classic French Dinner Rolls. Even my husband–the Eater of Everything–said they were delicious.

New French Roll from Udi's is dairy, soy and nut free. Allergens: egg and corn

New French Roll from Udi’s is dairy, soy and nut free. Allergens: egg and corn

Udi’s also has a new French Baguette that I’m planning to serve with split pea soup this evening. The boys are rallying for baguette pizza.

When I post Instagram photos of  my meals using Udi’s foods, I’m often asked where followers can buy Udi’s. Udi’s started in Colorado and I live in Colorado, yet many of my stores don’t carry the foods Udi’s offers.  If you go to their website catalog, there is a link to either order the products or find a store near you that carry the items. I suggest you ask the manager at your favorite grocery store to start carrying Udi’s; sometimes there is a form you can fill out.

Okay, so now that I have your mouth watering, I bet you’re wondering how you can enter to win one of Udi’s holiday prize packs or coupons for free product. It’s quite easy–just click here.

Good luck. And may you have a happy, healthy gluten-free New Year.

Udi's Gluten Free Giveaway

 

Start the New Year with Udi’s Gluten Free–Enter Giveaway Todayfirst appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.

Chocolate! Allergy Friendly! FREE!

If that headline got your attention, you’re probably a chocoholic like I am.

Did you also say this mantra when being tested for food allergies? Please don’t let me be allergic to chocolate. Please don’t let me be allergic to chocolate. Please don’t let me be allergic to chocolate.

Ha! You ARE a chocoholic like me!

Fortunately, to my great relief, I am NOT allergic to chocolate!

Unfortunately, I AM allergic to dairy, eggs, soy, gluten, corn and vanilla–all ingredients that are typically found in most chocolate.

For a long time, I was sad. Very, very sad. Especially during Valentines Day and my birthday. And maybe also Thanksgiving and Easter . . . and all the days in between.

But now I’ve recently discovered Amanda’s Own Confections. Actually they discovered me (thank you! thank you!), and it just so happens the month of April is both my celiac college son’s and my birthday month. Yes, I know the lemon in the sunglasses looks way too young to have a kid in college (or perhaps that’s why An Allergic Foodie uses a lemon for a Gravatar! LOL!).

Chocolate Bar Giveaway. Enter to win by Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 5 PM EST

Chocolate Bar Giveaway.
Enter to win by Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 5 PM EST

Anyway, back to chocolate. To celebrate our birthdays,  Amanda’s Own Confections wants to give one lucky person a present–a box of chocolate bars! That’s right! An entire box. TWELVE BARS OF GLORIOUS CHOCOLATE.

These chocolate bars make me close my eyes and moan–maybe that’s too much info?–and there are only three ingredients: Cane sugar, unsweetened chocolate, cocoa butter. So this makes them free of dairy, nuts, gluten, eggs, sesame, and fish/shellfish. (Why any fish would be in any chocolate is incomprehensible, but I’m told it happens.)

Here’s what you need to do to enter (you only have to do one, but if you do all I will do a happy dance and post it on You Tube*).

  • Write a comment below telling me how much you love chocolate (and my blog, of course).
  • Follow @anallergicfoodie on Instagram and like one of the pictures of Amanda’s chocolate bars. I’ll be posting several.
  • Follow me on Twitter–that 2,000 rule is killing me!–and tweet this blog post  with hashtag #amandasown
  • Like my Facebook Page and give a thumb’s up to one of my posts mentioning Amanda’s Own Confections.
  • Pin this blog post on Pinterest.

The contest will end on Tuesday, April 22, 8 PM EST. Must live in the U.S. to enter.

Ready. Set. Go!

I hope you win!

*I won’t really do a happy dance on You Tube because my sons, and maybe my husband, would be mortified.

Chocolate! Allergy Friendly! Free! first appeared at Adventures of An Allergic Foodie.

Allergic To Life: An Interview with a Survivor of Toxic Mold Part 2

This is Part 2 of my interview with Kathryn Chastain Treat, the author of Allergic to Life: My Battle for Survival, Courage, and Hope. Part 1 appeared yesterday at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.  

Kathryn, since reading your story about how toxic mold caused your severe allergies, I am much more aware of the chemicals in our lives, such as hairspray, dry cleaner bags, candles. Yesterday, when riding my bike, I passed a lady who must have bathed in perfume. I thought about you, how that perfume could send you to the hospital.  Your book opened my eyes to multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS).  How common is MCS?

MCS is far more common than we realize. There are many who will complain about what happens when they use bleach or when they walk down the cleaning aisle at the grocery store. The thing is that many aren’t listening to the signals their bodies are giving them that these chemically laden cleaners aren’t safe for them. Those with severe drug allergies are in a way part of the MCS community because drugs are made with chemicals. Doctors and many in the medical community are still reluctant to accept that there is such a thing as MCS, so when patients come in complaining of chest pain, asthma, brain fogginess, or muscle fatigue when around chemicals they are labeled as hypochondriac or as having somatoform disorders (mental disorders causing physical symptoms). The numbers will surely climb when, and if, the medical community becomes more learned in this area.

While getting treatment for life-threatening allergies to chemicals, Kathryn Treat had to live in a sterile environment.

While getting treatment for life-threatening allergies to chemicals, Kathryn Treat had to live in a sterile environment.

So what can we as a society do to make a difference in the lives of those with MCS?

As a society we can become better educated about how chemicals affect those with MCS, asthma, and the public in general.  We can lobby for testing of chemicals that are put in cleaners and cosmetics. Unfortunately, as long as the government and manufacturers can say less than 50 percent of the population experience problems, the chemicals will most likely continue to be used.

We can talk with our own doctors and stress the importance of keeping offices and waiting rooms fragrance free–no air fresheners, candles, and no cologne or perfume.  There is nothing worse than going to a medical facility with illness and then being bombarded with unnecessary chemicals.  Finally, we need to be accepting and accommodating of those who suffer with chemical sensitivity.

Kathryn Treat had to throw away many of her belongings because of potential chemical and mold contamination.

Kathryn Treat had to throw away many of her belongings because of potential chemical and mold contamination.

While you had some wonderful doctors, you also encountered some that weren’t, and you had to fight to get workers’ compensation. What advice would you give to someone who has just been diagnosed with a chronic illness such as yours?

My advice to someone newly diagnosed is to seek out doctors and those in the medical profession that understand or are willing to research and think out of the box.  I would also recommend that they research their illness and learn as much as they can about it and find online support groups. The hardest part about chronic illness is learning to accept our new limitations and to ask for help.  It took me a long time to accept that I wasn’t going to be able to do what I had done before. Giving up a lot of my independence and having to have others do things that I used to do was–and still is–extremely difficult.  My advice is to be accepting and to love yourself despite your limitations.  Treat yourself with the same love and compassion you would treat someone else in your shoes.

Anyone coping with chronic illness can benefit from reading your story, Katherine. Thank you for sharing, and I hope your health continues to improve.

Register to win a copy of Kathryn’s memoir at Rafflecopter

For a signed copy (US only), go to Kathryn’s websiteAllergic to Life Book Cover

The book is also available at Barnes and Noble and Amazon

For helpful resources, visit www.kathryntreat.com

This post originally appeared at Adventures of An Allergic Foodie